Sportex Time-saving resources for physical & manual therapists

rugby

  • Lessons from France: Latarjet vs remplissage? - Fisic Conference Presentation 2015 (8 mins)

    This content consists of a 8 minute video presentation professionally produced and presented at the Fisic Conference 2015.

    Dr Lionel Neyton is a French fellowship trained shoulder surgeon. He qualified in 1989 and his surgical training was undertaken at hospitals in Lyon and Nancy. After completing his residency program, he ran a one year shoulder fellowship with Gilles Walch in 2003. He then joined Pascal Boileau's department in Nice, France, for three years of practice.

    Since 2006, Dr Neyton is full time shoulder surgeon at Centre Orthopédique Santy and Hôpital Privé Jean Mermoz in Lyon, France. Dr Neyton completed the ASES-SECEC shoulder travelling fellowship September 2014. His practice is fully dedicated to shoulder surgery, arthroscopy and arthroplasties. He is shoulder referral physician for Lyon rugby team (LOU rugby) and football (OLYMPIQUE LYONNAIS).

  • Mechanisms of injury and relationship to pathology - Fisic Conference Presentation 2015 (9 mins)

    This content consists of a 9 minute video presentation professionally produced and presented at the Fisic Conference 2015.

    Professor Lennard Funk qualified in medicine at the University of Witwatersrand, in Johannesburg, in 1990. He earned his FRCS and FRCS (Tr & Orth) at the Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons, Glasgow and completed a Fellowship at the Reading shoulder Unit. In addition to his surgical qualifications, he holds a BSc in Sports Physiology and an MSc in Orthopaedic Engineering.

    Professor Funk specialises in arthroscopic and minimally invasive surgery of the shoulder and elbow, dealing in complex and tertiary referral cases. He routinely treats elite and professional athletes. His research interests and activities include sports injuries of the shoulder, surface replacement arthroplasty, arthroscopic simulator training, strain responses of rotator cuff tissue, orthobiologics in shoulder surgery and 3D MRI.

    Professor Funk holds Honorary Professorships at Salford University and at the University of Bolton. In addition to his surgical qualifications, he is a Fellow of the Faculty of Sports and Exercise Medicine UK and is involved in developing and running Postgraduate degrees for surgeons, therapists and sports clinicians in Orthopaedics. He lectures nationally and internationally on shoulder surgery, sports injuries and medical informatics. He is published widely in medical journals and a member of many international and national professional organisations. For more details visit www.shoulderdoc.co.uk

  • How can you reduce the risk of injury to a team? What can individual practitioners do? - Fisic Conference Presentation 2015 (22 mins)

    This content consists of a 22 minute video presentation professionally produced and presented at the Fisic Conference 2015.

    Simon Kemp graduated from St Mary's Hospital in 1986 and gained his Diploma in Sports Medicine from London University in 1992. Having completed his Primary Care training in the UK, he worked as a Sports Physician in Wellington, New Zealand from 1994-6. Returning to the UK, was a lecturer in Sports Medicine at the Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham in 1997.

    From 1998-2001, was team physician to Fulham Football club and Medical Officer to the English Basketball Association. In 2001, he joined the Rugby Football Union. He is the Tournament Medical Director for the 2015 Rugby World Cup, Chief Medical Officer for the Rugby Football Union and was the team physician during the Rugby World Cup campaigns in 2003 and 2007.

    runs a private Sport and Exercise Medicine service in SW London focussing on the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of sports injuries and musculoskeletal problems. He is the Honorary Secretary of the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine.

    is currently a member of the World Rugby Medicine, Science and Research and Head Injury Assessment Working Groups, and has major research interests in injury and injury epidemiology and concussion risk management.

  • What skills do you need to work pitch-side in rugby union? - Fisic Conference Presentation 2015 (12 mins)

    This content consists of a 12 minute video presentation professionally produced and presented at the Fisic Conference 2015.

    Mr Andy Smith is an Emergency Medicine Consultant for the Mid-Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust and a Yorkshire Ambulance Service BASICS doctor. He is also the director of both the Rugby Football Union Immediate Care in Sport Programme and the Welsh Rugby Union Immediate Care in Rugby Programme.

    He qualified from Leeds Medical School and is now a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. Mr Smith is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Faculty of Pre Hospital Care), Fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine and Fellow of the Faculty of Sport & Exercise Medicine (UK).

    Mr Smith is the Technical Director and Senior Medical Educator for World Rugby's Immediate Care in Rugby programme, the Immediate Care Lead (Players & Officials) for Twickenham Match Day, a Clinical Governance Advisor for Premiership Rugby and a Medical Officer in the England 2015 Medical Advisory Group. His special interests include Emergency Medicine, Immediate Care in Sport and Sports Medicine.

    Mr Smith worked at both the Olympics and Commonwealth Games as a Field of Play Team Leader for the athletics. Mr Smith is Vice Chair of the Faculty of Pre Hospital Care RCSED Training & Standards Board, Senior Lecturer at Leeds Medical School, and visiting Lecturer at Salford, Hull, Bolton, St. Mary's and Middlesex Universities.

  • What is the risk of injury in professional rugby & is it the same at all levels? An overview of the known injury risk, injury profile & current trends in injury in professional 15-a-side rugby, community & age-group rugby - Fisic Conference Presentation

    This content consists of a 15 minute video presentation professionally produced and presented at the Fisic Conference 2015.

    Dr Keith Stokes is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Bath with a background in exercise physiology.

    His research focuses on understanding sports injury risk to inform the development and delivery of preventative interventions.

    Dr Stokes joined the University of Bath in 2002 and is a Senior Lecturer in Exercise Physiology. He completed a PhD at Loughborough University in 2001 and was a Lecturer at Stirling University from 2001-2.

    Dr Stokes is responsible for delivering injury surveillance programmes for the England Rugby (men and women) and the English Premiership, as well as men's community rugby and schools rugby in England, and is part of the team that carried out the IRB (now World Rugby) Scrum Forces project, which resulted in changes to the scrum Laws. He is an Editor of the International Journal of Sports Medicine and is co-founder and Network Editor of the World Rugby Science Network.

  • What is it like to play rugby in 2015? An overview of the player anthropometrics, match & training events/demands & volumes that characterise the modern game of 15s - Fisic Conference Presentation 2015 (14 mins)

    This content consists of a 14 minute video presentation professionally produced and presented at the Fisic Conference 2015.

    Dr Ken Quarrie is the Senior Scientist for New Zealand Rugby and a member of two World Rugby Advisory Groups. Following the completion of a degree in physical education at the University of Otago in 1989, Dr Quarrie undertook a master's degree examining the biomechanics of rugby scrummaging. In 1993, he became involved in the Rugby Injury and Performance Project (RIPP) and has been studying aspects of rugby performance and injury management ever since.

    In 2000, Dr Quarrie was appointed as the inaugural Injury Prevention Manager for New Zealand Rugby and was responsible, with the Accident Compensation Corporation, for developing and managing a nationwide injury prevention programme to reduce the incidence of permanently disabling injuries resulting from rugby. Since 2000, there has been an 89% reduction in scrum-related spinal injuries, and a reduction of 56% in all injuries resulting in permanent disablement. The programme has since been taken up in a number of countries around the world, including South Africa, Australia and Japan.

    In 2008, Dr Quarrie completed a PhD in the epidemiology of rugby injuries. Since 2007, he has focused on analysing player performance and team strategies and tactics. As such, he provides a range of analyses and reports to high performance coaches and staff within New Zealand Rugby.

    Dr Quarrie is a Research Associate at AUT University, and the Senior Research Consultant for the New Zealand Transport Accident Investigation Commission. He also serves as a Section Editor for Match Analysis on the World Rugby Science Network website.

    Dr Quarrie has published a wide range of academic papers on aspects of injury and risk management and performance. He is currently working on a project studying the long-term health outcomes of playing rugby and is taking a special interest in issues regarding concussion management.